Posts Tagged ‘ Patrick Bradley ’

Patrick Bradley – Intangible

Patrick Bradley‘s new album is entitled Intangible. According to conventional definition that means not made of physical substance or not able to be touched. An adjective that applies to all forms of music. Patrick Bradley addressed with this adjective on one hand his musical influences, on the other hand all kinds of friendship.

If we put aside the spiritual superstructure, we recognize a new project where Patrick once again is working with keyboard legend Jeff Lorber. Further musicians on this recordings are Paul Jackson Jr., Adam Hawley and Michael Thompson (guitar), Jimmy Haslip (bass), Andrew Carney (trumpet), Gary Novak (drums) and David Mann (horns). All songs were composed by Patrick and Jeff Lorber.

With the striving forward piece Dear Friend Patrick honors all late artists, who have influenced his musical development like Keith Emerson (ELP), George Duke, Joe Sample and more. On this fast paced introduction Patrick and Jeff share their sparkling keys ideas. Funky Green was influenced by a trip to the miraculous island of Kauai. The performance of both musicians on organ, keyboards, piano is simply spectacular.

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Patrick Bradley – Intangible

The spiritually-minded jazz fusion keyboardist Patrick Bradley doesn’t need a special occasion like marking his tenth anniversary as a recording artist to acknowledge his inspirations both tangible and divine. However, “Dear Friend,” the first single from his forthcoming fourth album, Intangible, due August 25, does just that, slated to arrive ten years after the release of his first solo set. Written with the album’s producer, Jeff Lorber, “Dear Friend” pays respectful homage to the seminal musicians who influence and inform Bradley’s contemporary jazz, rock, fusion and R&B mashups released on the Patrick’s Song Factory label.

“My intent was to honor the influence and significant impact that late musicians have on me musically such as keyboardist giants Keith Emerson, Richard Wright, George Duke, Joe Sample and Jon Lord. Bass players Chris Squire and Jaco Pastorius and guitarist Alan Holdsworth have a major influence on my approach to arrangements and melodies. Their influences are woven throughout my musical experiences, abilities and styles,” said Bradley, who wrote and arranged the ten songs that comprise “Intangible” with Lorber. “The tune also celebrates friendship of all kinds – whether it is the intimate friendship between a spouse or lover, a trusted best friend, a mentor, your family pet or the friendship expressed through songs of faith.”

Intangible is the third outing for Bradley and Lorber, the latter of whom is a keyboardist widely recognized as one of the forefathers of jazz fusion, thus an element of mentorship is evident in their ongoing creative friendship. “Jeff and I work very well together. Coming into the studio, I had about 18 songs to work with for this project and we selected ten. Collaborating with Jeff always draws out new dimensions and makes me dig deeper.” Continue reading

Patrick Bradley – Can You Hear Me

Business success and good music do not interfere, they are a pleasant addition. As a successful businessman Patrick Bradley can live his musical passion without restrictions. Can You Hear Me is not a question but his third album after Come Rain Or Shine (2006) and Under The Sun (2011).

The album is well padded with illustrious musicians such as Jeff Lorber, Dave Koz, Jimmy Haslip, Gary Novak, David Mann, Rick Braun, Eric Marienthal, Dwight Sills and Michael Thompson. Nearly all songs were composed by Bradley in collaboration with Jeff Lorber, who also produced the new project.

What we miss at Jeff Lorber’s own jazz fusion albums of the last time, we see on his smooth jazz productions for other musicians in abundance. All In welcomes us with soothing sounds, where we feel at home.

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Patrick Bradley – Can You Hear Me

CanYouHearMeTo bolster his effort to be heard above the incessant din cluttering our world, keyboardist Patrick Bradley called upon a few high-profile friends on his third album, “Can You Hear Me,” produced by jazz fusion icon Jeff Lorber, which is slated for release September 23 on the Patrick’s Music Factory label. Boil it down further and the desire to be heard by our parents is inherent in all of us, which is the genesis of the title track and first radio single, a plaintive piano lullaby graced with the serene soprano sax presence of Dave Koz on the song inspired by Bradley’s late mother.

Collaborating on their second album together, Bradley and Lorber composed and arranged all ten songs on “Can You Hear Me.” Bradley nimbly emotes graceful harmonies on piano, adds depth and texture via gurgling Moog synthesizer embellishments and uncorks feverish organ blasts with reckless abandon when the mood to pontificate strikes. A variety of jazz visages – fusion, contemporary and smooth – emerge from tracks rooted in R&B that reflect prisms of funk, soul and blues with the deep-pocketed grooves stitched by bassist Jimmy Haslip and drummer Gary Novak. David Mann’s fiery horns and crisp horn arrangements fatten the sound on “Blue Skies,” “Daylight,” “For Her” and “Voyage” with hitman Rick Braun captured blowing away on trumpet on a pair of cuts (“Blue Skies” and “Voyage”) and Eric Marienthal chiming in some swinging sax on a few numbers (“Blue Skies,” “Shoreline” and “Catalan”). Lorber’s keyboard and Dwight Sills’ guitar riff rhythmically throughout the session with Sills and guitarist Michael Thompson dousing kerosene before slash and burn solos. Both Bradley and Lorber solo on the blistering progressive rock thrill ride “North Of Evermore.”

“I’ve been playing my whole life and I’m trying to be heard in this noisy world as a musician. My mom passed before hearing my last album (“Under The Sun”) including the song I wrote for my (late) father (“Tears From The Sky”). I wonder if she can hear me and my music. I wrote ‘Can You Hear Me’ with her in mind, but it is also a question I ask God as well,” said Bradley, a man of faith who hails from Southern California. “The original album title was ‘All In’ (the first song on the record) because I wanted to dig deeper than ever before. The whole purpose of the album was to make sure that I got all of my musical chops into it and I think we did it.” Continue reading

Patrick Bradley – Under The Sun

What is the recipe for a successful album? Elect Jeff Lorber as your executing producer, write some intelligent arrangements and let them play by musicians like Dave Koz, Eric Marienthal, Rick Braun, Dwight Sills, Michael Thompson, Alex Al, Nate Phillips, Tony Moore, Dave Weckl, David Mann and Irene B.

Southern California native Patrick Bradley uses this recipe for his second album Under The Sun, which was released April 26th, 2011. Patrick comments: “The idea behind this record is to enjoy life and celebrate all it offers during the brief time we have under the sun. No matter what life dishes up, we should keep our dreams alive and pursue our passion, hopes and aspirations.

The last few years have been challenging for all of us as we find ourselves in times of change and uncertainty. Seasons of change hit home for me personally when my parents passed away. I found myself in a period of reflection. These songs were written in times of joy, sorrow and triumph, yet with an eye on eternity. Life is speeding by. My hope is that we all will take the time to prioritize and tend to the important things and important people and relationships, and not just chase the mad pursuits of this life.”

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Patrick Bradley – Under The Sun

Thanks to Rick Scott of Great Scott Productions, I have a copy of keyboardist Patrick Bradley’s second album and I’ve taken a look at Patrick’s website to find out more about the man and his music.

Patrick is a self-taught musician who was born in and resides in Southern California. He is eager to perform music from “Under the Sun” live. As I said, this is his second album, following 2007’s “Come Rain or Shine”.

On the chunky opener ‘Straight Path’ I can already draw parallels with the work of co-producer Jeff Lorber. The staccato right-hand piano work over this busy bassline and sharp snare crack gets the head nodding. David Mann’s horn arrangement adds that extra touch of pizzazz.

Tony Moore on drums keeps things moving at a cracking pace on ‘Into the Sunset’ which I love particularly for the chorus section. The use of keyboards and guitar together in this section is very uplifting and I also like the way a kind of mystical Eastern feel creeps into the song just over halfway through. When the song reverts to the chorus again, that hook feels like an old friend. This song really is a grower.

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Patrick Bradley – Under the Sun

Talk about mixed emotions. That’s what jazz fusion artist Patrick Bradley will experience April 26th, when he celebrates his birthday by releasing his second album, Under the Sun. April 26th also marks the anniversary of his father’s passing. Bradley’s mother passed away eleven months to the day after his father. It was one heck of a year. But instead of sorrow, the keyboardist-songwriter turned to his faith when composing or co-writing eleven songs of hope, adventure and spiritual surrender for a record produced by seminal fusion keyboardist Jeff Lorber.

In addition to Bradley’s and Lorber’s high-level, tag team keyboard artistry, the musicianship on Under the Sun is equally stellar, thanks to the masterful performances of saxmen Dave Koz and Eric Marienthal, flugelhorn and trumpeter Rick Braun, guitarists Dwight Sills and Michael Thompson, bassists Alex Al and Nate Phillips, drummers Tony Moore and Dave Weckl, horn section work from David Mann, and the sultry voice of Irene B.

With the genesis of the collection coming from reading Ecclesiastes, Bradley harnessed a variety of influences and inspirations for Under the Sun, on which he played piano, keyboards, organ and Moog synthesizers. Bradley refers to the deep-pocketed “Straight Path,” the first track to be serviced to radio stations, as his “life verse” as it is about trusting the Lord for guidance. A lilting and joyous celebration of love with a cascading piano hook, “Into the Sunset” was written for his wife, Lisa. Koz and Irene B. add seductive elements to the R&B ballad “Just Let Go.”

Bradley is a passionate road cyclist and he offers a taste of the adrenaline rush experienced while descending in a pack on “Slipstream,” which includes a lead-out from Braun’s horns. The unpredictability of life is the focus of “Time and Chance,” which delivers the message to live life to the fullest while being unafraid of taking chances. “Crows on the Lawn” swings. The poignant “Tears from the Sky” was written after his father’s passing and it’s an expansive, emotional piece both mournful and celebratory. “Rush Street” and the majestic “The Empress of Dalmatia” explode into aggressive progressive rock-jazz fusion jams ignited by Sills’ incendiary guitar pyrotechnics.

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