Posts Tagged ‘ Konstantin Klashtorni ’

Love Suggestions – Sax Night

Multi-instrumentalist Konstantin Klashtorni has designed the Love Suggestions series for lovers to spend nice evenings together. The main emphasis is on one instrument in the foreground without neglecting other instruments. That in mind he already released Piano Night in 2013 and Guitar Night in 2014. Now he returns with the long-awaited Sax Night.

With a romantic and melodious approach he creates R&B oriented smooth jazz with that certain twist. Listening to the first notes of Thick of It brings back in mind, what we miss since the release of his latest album in 2016. With the perfect balance of flavor coming out of the land of rhythm and groove Konstantin creates with sax, flute and guitar the magical melody line.

There Goes My Baby rides on an emotional wave incorporating gospel elements and some retro feeling. Sax and guitar are living in a fine neighborhood. The sweeping ballad Shape of You reunites flute and sax to a deceptively accessible celestial arrangement. Don’t Wanna Know flows in a coherent fluid music stream that is smooth like Italian ice cream.

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Saxing Up – Bee Gees Love Songs

Saxophonist Konstantin Klashtorni is best known for his unbelievable creativity transformed in a plethora of smooth jazz albums. Compared to his other projects Saxing Up is unique.

On this album from 2007 which is currently not available, he covered famous Love Songs of the Bee Gees. Recorded in the KVK Music studio in Rotterdam, Netherland this musical gem has stood the test of time.

The album starts with How Deep Is Your Love, a pop ballad written and recorded by the Bee Gees in 1977. Although the tune lives from the falsetto lead vocal of Robin Gibb, is Konstantin on sax a gorgeous replacement.

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Konstantin Klashtorni – Led By You

Saxophonist Konstantin Klashtorni continued his solo career with his sophomore album Led By You in 2006. It’s different to most of his other projects, because he invited several other artists to join his recordings.

Udo Demandt (drums and percussion), Yerman Aponte (bass), Roy Lewis (guitar), Michael Simon (trumpet), Santiago Cananda Valvere (trombone), Ibernice McBean as backing vocalist and Mitchel Brunings as lead vocalist are sharing his compositions on selected tracks.

The album begins with Back It Up. A stirring tune with Konstantin’s vibrant sax in progression. So Lovely inspires with sax, flute and natural sounds. Nice warmth and accessibility captures the audience. It Dews is the redeeming call after a long and severe winter period. Konstantin tracks musically the way of every single drop. An emotive flow pushing the music over the sonic edge.

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Konstantin Klashtorni – Downtown

Multi-instrumentalist Konstantin Klashtorni meanwhile has released a plethora of smooth jazz albums, I had the pleasure to review. But unforgettable is his debut album Downtown, with which his splendid career had a fulminate start.

He just had traveled the world and now decided to take his fortune in his own hand. At this time he stayed in Netherlands before he later settled in Germany. Downtown shows an artist in the beginning of his creative career. The sax is definitely in the lead and the percussion is like child’s wonderland.

On Waiting For You Konstantin expands his romantic muscles. Easy Moving relies on a stomping beat and spreads feeling good mood. The 70’s was the time of the Roland drum machines of the TR series. The TR stands for transistor rhythm. Hundreds of popular songs were propelled by these rhythm machines and Lullaby is quasi a tribute to this time.

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Konstantin Klashtorni – Smooth Jazz II

Konstantin Klashtorni was performing strongly in the contemporary jazz scene. What brought the turn around to smooth jazz? Konstantin explains: “ My tastes have changed with time, although first saxophonists records I ever heard were David Sanborn and Eric Marienthal, and only after that I went studying Cannonball Adderley and Charlie Parker.

However I always liked that light jazz, in the style of Spyro Gyra and Mezzoforte. The reason I changed the direction was because I moved to Europe, where Chill out, Electronica and Lounge are much more heard then Smooth Jazz. I liked it so much, that I started to use this very elements in my music too in order to not to compete with Americans playing straight Smooth Jazz (it’s their music, and they do it FENOMENAL) and to enrich this genre, maybe to give this genre another direction, who knows?

I believe I managed in some way to do that. I noticed that many musicians are making music for people as if those all were musicians too, I try to make music for normal people well within SJ genre.″ Klashtorni released in 2011 his second album of the Smooth Jazz series. This time he was joined by Wolf Martini on guitars.

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Konstantin Klashtorni – Smooth Jazz I

Multi-instrumentalist Konstantin Klashtorni follows the tradition of many professional jazz musicians such as John Coltrane and Wayne Shorter, Eric Dolphy and Herbie Mann. In the era of home studios this is a fairly common time appearance.

Klashtorni is recording his albums this way since several years. In 2011 he started his Smooth Jazz series with the album Smooth Jazz I. Nevertheless on this special album he was joined by Adir Kochavi (trumpet, flugelhorn), Roy Louis (bass and guitars), Glenn Gaddum (piano), and several gifted singers on selected tracks.

The powerful Let’s Get It On with the sax in the lead gives the album a perfect start. With the addition of a second saxophone the song gets an extra dose of vigorous energy.

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Love Suggestions – Guitar Night

The Love Suggestions series are entitled Piano Night and Guitar Night. This year Konstantin Klashtorni will probably release Sax Night. That sounds like one instrument on each album in the lead.

Konstantin comments꞉ “True, that was my idea, it’s like a piano, guitar and sax player each recorded an album in the same vein. By the way, those are 3 instruments I like to feature on all my releases, I like the combination of different instruments a lot, depending on mood and kind of arrangement. I find it quite boring when only one instrument is playing hole song long, no matter how good it is.

I believe people like a variety very much, by the way in the mean of time I’ve learned a bit to listen music with “normal” people’s ears, just a bit! Wish I could do it much better to understand what Jazz music people like most and why.″

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