Posts Tagged ‘ Jimmy Haslip ’

Branly, Ruiz, Haslip – Elemental

Top musicians have a certain resemblance to star chefs. Their outstanding position is based on talent and a lot of passion. When three musical greats come together, then we experience an event of a special kind, fusion jazz in the truest sense of the word. Otmaro Ruiz, Jimmy Branly, and Jimmy Haslip form Elemental.

On the new album Otmaro Ruiz performs piano, Fender Rhodes and synths, Jimmy Branly drums, and Jimmy Haslip electric bass. Ruiz has written all tracks with the exception of Boomtown, which is from the Yellowjackets album Mint Jam (2001).

The aptly titled introduction A Good Start presents three of the most talented contemporary jazz players on the scene in a breathtaking action. Otmar Ruiz keeps the music flowing on synth and keys while Branly and Haslip provide the right rhythmic frame for it.

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Otmaro Ruiz – Jimmy Branly – Jimmy Haslip – Elemental

Grammy-nominated Pianist/Composer Otmaro Ruiz, Drummer Jimmy Branly and Bassist Jimmy Haslip team up together to create an incredible jazz trio album titled, Elemental. All compositions by Otmaro Ruiz (Minina Music ASCAP), except “Boomtown” by Jimmy Haslip & Russell Ferrante (LaViera Music BMI, Teeth Music BMI). Considered one of the most important jazz pianists in the current scene, Venezuelan Otmaro Ruiz is known for his versatility and virtuosity. Regarded as one of the most sought-after keyboardists for recordings in today’s scene, Otmaro is still able to dedicate time to teaching, scoring of movie sound-tracks and to the production of his works as a leader with original compositional material, captured in the CDs “Otmaro Ruiz plays Ryuichi Sakamoto”, “Distant Friends”, “Nothing to Hide”, “Latino” and in his most recent album “Sojourn”.

Jimmy Branly was born in Havana, Cuba, and grew up in a rich musical environment of Cuban flavors. Jimmy moved to the United States in 1998, performing and recording with many groups and artists. Jimmy Haslip was born December 31st, 1951 in the Bronx, New York. He grew up in Huntington, Long Island. Jimmy was actively composing, arranging, producing and performing with Yellowjackets. He also worked and recorded with numerous other musicians among them Jeff Lorber.

“This is a beautiful album! Incredible compositions, playing, inter-play and production. This is a phenomenal album for fans of great music (jazz/fusion aficionados will especially love this). Everyone needs this album!” (Joseph Patrick Moore)

Elemental is scheduled for release 11-23-2018 in all online and offline shops. Listen to the album here.

Jimmy Haslip, Scott Kinsey, Gergö Borlai – ARC Trio

The jazz fusion musicians Jimmy Haslip, Scott Kinsey, Gergö Borlai have come together under the band name ARC Trio to create their eclectic imagination of how fusion jazz has to sound. Each musician comes from a different cultural background, but they are united in the direction of the joint project.

The most famous member is certainly bassist Jimmy Haslip who was a founding member and 32 year band mate of The Yellowjackets, before he decided to concentrate his activity in a plethora of different undertakings and formations. Among the artists he has played with are names such as David Sanborn, Pat Metheny, Al Jarreau, Joe Cocker, Rod Stewart, George Harrison, Chaka Khan, Diana Ross and many more.

Keyboardist and pianist Scott Kinsey has worked with Joe Zawinul, John McLaughlin, Pete Erskine, Victor Wooten, Mike Stern, Dave Weckl, Bill Evans, John Patitucci, John Scofield among others. Hungarian drummer Gergö Borlai is professor at the Liceu Academy/Jazz department in Barcelona and performed with jazz stars like Al DiMeola and Hiram Bullock. Guest musicians on this album are drummers Vinnie Colaiuta and Gary Novak, Steve Tavaglione on sax, flute and EWI, and Judd Miller on EVI.

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Terje Lie – Urban Vacation

Norwegian native Terje Lie decided to move to the U.S. like many other European musicians because of Europe’s cultural music desert, when it comes to smooth jazz or contemporary jazz. His decision was right on the money.

“It’s great to look back and think about all the different styles of music I’ve played and the wide variety of places I have performed in my life,” Lie says. “When I’m on stage performing or recording music in the studio, time disappears.”

Saxophonist Terje Lie started his solo career with the album Traveler (2007) featuring contemporary jazz greats Jimmy Haslip and Jeff Lorber. “Jeff and Jimmy enlightened me to many new angles and concepts that made this a fantastic experience for me. It’s been a great thing to record with them and the result is a seriously kickin’ album!”

Understandable that his sophomore album Urban Vacation (2010) was produced and performed by the same successful duo. Besides these musicians plays Tony Moore most of the drum parts. Additional guest-musicians are Mike Landau (guitar), Sharon Perry (vocals), Ernest Tibbs (bass), Jeff Olson (drums), Dwight Sills (guitar), Gary Meek (sax), and Ron King (trumpet).

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Jimmy Haslip – Blues for Tony

When drummer Tony Williams died of a heart attack on February 23, 1997, at the relatively young age of 51, it was a tremendous loss for straight-ahead post-bop and hard bop as well as for fusion. Williams had numerous acoustic jazz credentials, and his band Lifetime was one of the most important fusion outfits of the `70s.

The late drummer’s fusion side is what electric guitarist Allan Holdsworth, electric bassist Jimmy Haslip (of Yellowjackets fame), keyboardist Alan Pasqua and drummer Chad Wackerman pay tribute to on Blues for Tony, an excellent two-CD set that was recorded live in 2007. Forming a quartet, the improvisers remember Williams not by trying to sound like a carbon copy of Lifetime, but rather, by celebrating the overall spirit of Williams’ fusion output.

Holdsworth, in fact, worked with Williams when he replaced John McLaughlin as Lifetime’s guitarist in 1975; it was a brief association (Holdsworth left Lifetime the following year), although certainly a noteworthy one. And like Lifetime, this quartet (which performs mostly material by Holdsworth and Pasqua) demonstrates that being influenced by rock and funk and making extensive use of electric instruments doesn’t mean that a group cannot maintain a jazz mentality.

In fact, Blues for Tony thrives on a jazz mentality. Improvisation and spontaneity prevail, and even though Blues for Tony is by no means straight-ahead acoustic jazz, the quartet’s amplified performances can easily be described as “the sound of surprise” (to borrow a term coined by the late jazz critic Whitney Balliett). These performances underscore the fact that–contrary to what myopic jazz purists and bop snobs would have us believe–fusion is not pseudo-jazz. Fusion is authentic jazz, but it’s authentic jazz for people who also appreciate rock and funk. Blues for Tony is an album that fusion lovers shouldn’t miss –  Alex Henderson.

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