Posts Tagged ‘ Jackiem Joyner ’

Jackiem Joyner – Touch

For saxophonist Jackiem Joyner standstill is not a condition. No wonder that he has shaped his solo career in a short period of time with a multitude of releases. This Time Around (2005), Baby Soul (2007), Lil’ Man Soul (2008), Jackiem Joyner (2010), Church Boy (2012), Evolve (2014) and Main Street Beat (2017) are signals of his creativity and quality.

In view of the decline of the music business in the classical sense, it is vital for musicians to create new business areas and build up their network with other musicians. On his new album Touch (2019) Jackiem has invited guitarist Peter White and flutist Najee, who are well known far beyond their genre. In addition he is supported by JP Mourao (acoustic guitar), Kyle Bolden (electric guitar), Timothy Bailey, D. Baker (various instruments), Dee Cole Laing, and Brittany Frappier (vocals).

The romantic aspect of music seems to be a sought-after field of activity for many musicians. Last Dance follows the same musical line with a softly played soprano saxophone and Peter White’s lyrical approach on acoustic guitar.

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Jackiem Joyner – Touch

The official release date for “Touch” is here! Oct 11, 2019 and I am really excited! Big thanks to everyone who helped make this project a reality! Gilbert Fambro, mastering engineer Steve Hall, Bud Harner. Many great musicians: Tim bailey Jr, Kyle Bolden, Dee Kole-Lang, Britt Frappier, D. Baker and so many more! Also Don and Julie Herndon, Cynthia Gills, Greg Gills. Many wonderful people help to make this a success.

I put down some of my best R&B laced tracks with this project. Down tempo vibes and beats to put you in the right mood for romance. Whatever that means for you! A few grooves like “Last Dance” that put memorable melodies in your head. I admit. I plan to get into your head with this record! If you like “Babysoul” 2007, you will love this even more! I wanted to deliver something hip, smooth, and sexy at the same time. Something to make you feel good. I’m joined by Multi-Platinum & Grammy Nominated saxophonist and flautist Najee along with smooth jazz super star Peter White.

Pre-order your album now at Amazon.com.

Jackiem Joyner – Main Street Beat

After Baby Soul (2007), Lil’ Man Soul (2008), Jackiem Joyner (2010), Church Boy (2012) and Evolve (2014) it would simply be an understatement, to describe saxophonist Jackiem Joyner as someone still in development. Jackiem Joyner has gained cult status and Main Street Beat (2017) is the exclamation point behind this statement.

The new album features besides the Yamaha performing artist Jackiem Joyner a dream cast of musicians like Timothy Bailey Jr. (multi instruments), Kyle Bolden and Darryl Williams (bass), Dee-Cole-Laing, Nikolai Egarov and Britt Frappier (trombone), Nick Colionne, Michael “Big Mike” Hart Jr., Steve Oliver, Gabe Roland and Carnell Harnell (guitar), and Raymond Johnson (tenor saxophone).

The center of a town, of urban activities and cultural diversity is often called Main Street. This song embraces the ease and grace with which city life can be approached and brings all into the musical focus of Jackiem’s saxophone.

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Jackiem Joyner – Main Street Beat

Delivering on his promise to “Evolve,” the title of Jackiem Joyner’s last soul-jazz album, the saxophonist became a father since his 2014 release, an elation-inducing experience that informs the music he wrote and produced for his new Artistry Music set, “Main Street Beat,” due June 30. The first single from the funky, dance inspiring, Motown-influenced session that will be shipped to radio this month is the exultant “Trinity,” named for Joyner’s first child whose presence on the track is voiced by Steve Oliver’s incandescent acoustic guitar.

Joyner approached crafting “Main Street Beat” with a three-pronged purpose. “I wanted to create something upbeat, fun to listen to and something to dance to. ‘Main Street Beat’ originally started off as a straight funk record that eventually became some of that, but a whole lot more as I allowed the creative process to have its way with me,” said Joyner, a Billboard chart-topper who plays tenor, alto, soprano and baritone saxophone on the date, often enriching the tracks by laying layer upon layer of horns to form a powerhouse sax section.

The exuberant album opener, “Main Street,” exemplifies the mighty wall-of-horns approach with Joyner playing lead harmonies on alto reinforced by his sax section. Instead of tracking individually, Joyner brought the band – drummer Raymond Johnson, bassist Darryl Williams, electric guitarist Kyle Bolden and piano player Carnell Harrell – into the studio to record six tracks old-school style, including “Back To Motown.” Nick Colionne guests on “When You Smile” to flash his cool electric jazz guitar on the infectious mid-tempo R&B cut. Taking his alto sax chops out for a strut, Joyner cranks up the band for a fiery funk romp down “Southside Boulevard,” one of three tunes that adds Nikolai Egorov’s trombone muscle to the horn section. On a pair of urban joints – “That Good Thing” and “Don’t Make Her Wait” – Joyner plays soprano sax. He takes full command on the stormy “Addicted,” playing every instrument heard on the moody number. “Think James Brown on tenor sax” is how Joyner describes the super funky “Get Down Street.” A pair of high-energy pop-R&B covers – Justin Timberlake’s “Can’t Stop The Feeling” and Bruno Mars’ “Treasure” – complete the outing, songs Joyner elected to record based upon their buoyant, positive nature, which he says mirrors his young offspring’s personality. Continue reading

Jackiem Joyner – Evolve

Evolution is the keyword for saxophonist Jackiem Joyner. Baby Soul (2007), Lil’ Man Soul (2008), Jackiem Joyner (2010) and Church Boy (2012) are step stones to what Jackiem is today. With the upcoming Evolve (2014) he marks his current level of development.

“Music evolves, including jazz. All types of sound evolve. So do people and our imaginations. That is what I tried to put on tape. Evolve captures the changes in my musical mind and how I have evolved as an artist,” explains multi-instrumentalist Jackiem Joyner.

On his new album are appearing sax player Gerald Albright and keyboardist Keiko Matsui. Joyner’s touring band Kayta Matsuno (guitar), Tim Bailey (bass), Bill Steinway (keyboard) and Raymond Johnson (drums) add their signature on several cuts. On Generation Next Jackiem touches with his emotional sax blows well embedded in a group of orchestral strings.

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Jackiem Joyner – Evolve

EvolveAs a young turk on the contemporary jazz scene, saxophonist Jackiem Joyner is far from complacent and staid in his sound and style. Not afraid to challenge the fan base that took him to No. 1 twice and Top 3 two more times on the Billboard chart, Joyner gets adventurous on his fifth album, “Evolve,” which will be released April 29th by Artistry Music/Mack Avenue Records. It’s his first on which he wrote and produced the entire set, including the first single going to radio in mid-March, “Generation Next,” an up-tempo urban-pop track with vibrant flashes of strings that provide a contrast to Joyner’s gentle melodic sax.

Juxtaposing invigorating otherworldly sonicscapes under tender sax melodies, “Evolve” is a dynamic, highly-rhythmic session that is unpredictable laced with traces of the familiar. Listening will take you to a different place while defining Joyner as a musician and a writer beyond what we have already heard from the chart-topping rhythm and groove guy. The imaginative new set has a greater purpose with the introductory single, “Generation Next,” serving as “a declaration that the next generation of jazz musicians is here to stay. Music evolves, including jazz. All types of sound evolve. So do people and our imaginations. That is what I tried to put on tape. ‘Evolve’ captures the changes in my musical mind and how I have evolved as an artist. Rather than fitting in with the traditional, I’m bringing the audience along with songs that unfold over different and interesting soundscapes even as I move towards a live organic sound,” explains Joyner.

In addition to playing alto and soprano sax on the record, Joyner is a multi-instrumentalist who played many of the instruments heard on the collection along with a couple of high-profile assists from Grammy-nominated sax player Gerald Albright and internationally-renowned keyboardist Keiko Matsui. The collaborations are noteworthy for different reasons. When Joyner was in high school, Albright was his idol thus dueting with him on “Big Step” was a thrill. Joyner tours in Matsui’s band when not performing his own dates and wrote “Europa” with her mind. On a few tracks, he was joined by his touring band – guitarist Kayta Matsuno, bassist Tim Bailey, keyboardist Bill Steinway and drummer Raymond Johnson – to record live in the studio. Continue reading

Jackiem Joyner – Church Boy

Saxophonist Jackiem Joyner from Norfolk, Virginia, has a good name in the smooth jazz genre. With his albums Baby Soul (2007), Lil’ Man Soul (2008) and Jackiem Joyner (2010) he has built up a strong following.

So far we had only known that he played with Marcus Johnson from 2001–2004, and also performed with Bobby Lyle, Angela Bofill, George Duke, Najee and many others.

With his new album Church Boy (2012) he gives us the first glimpse into the dark ages of his youth. In Mack Avenue’s biography he reports about the difficult times, when he found himself with no money, no job and homeless.

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Jackiem Joyner – Church Boy

Born in Norfolk VA and raised in a single-parent household in Buffalo NY, Jackiem Joyner came through the church choir before taking up the saxophone in high school. After high school Joyner returned to Norfolk. There Bishop Michael Patterson of the World Harvest Outreach Ministries in Newport News made him head of the music department. Joyner not only sharpened his musical and production skills in this capacity, he also had a chance to play for audiences in Nigeria, Sudan and Kenya on a Missions trip in 2002.

Church Boy stems from my time as a young and eager boy who wanted to play a part in the music ministry. I can remember very well a time when I couldn’t wait until church service was over so I could get a chance to bang on the instruments! One day the pastor of my church told me that I was going to learn an instrument and be very involved in the Gospel ministry. I had no instrumental ex¬perience and had no idea what he was talking about. Church Boy takes me and the audience back to church. Although my previous albums are in the ‘jazz or smooth jazz’ genre, I have always believed that my music comes from God. Every new talent that I acquire, I make it a point to dedicate it to my Father God and Lord Jesus Christ. This album will confirm my place in the music ministry of God.”

Church Boy features a collection of contemporary Gospel songs including Toby Mac’s “City On Our Knees,” Israel & New Breed s “You Are Good” and Kirk Franklin s “Hosanna.” Kirk Whalum joins Jackiem on Kirk Franklin’s “I Smile” and Jonathan Butler plays the lead acoustic guitar on Tye Tribbett’s “Bless The Lord (Son Of Man).”

Jackiem Joyner – Jackiem Joyner

Jackiem Joyner started his career as sideman in Marcus Johnson’s band along with tours accompanying Bobby Lyle, Angela Bofill, Ronnie Laws and Jean Carne.

Already with his debut album Baby Soul (2007) he built the fundament of a strong fan community receiving high acclaims. His sophomore release Lil’ Man Soul (2008) quickly climbed the jazz charts. His newest release Jackiem Joyner (2010) sets unique accents just to make a difference to the legion of other smooth jazz saxophonists.

“The whole record is about writing and making the type of record that I wanted to make. It’s me putting whatever I want on the album. I’m happy working with Mack Avenue because they gave me complete freedom to create. You can really hear me right upfront and my music. My first two albums were titled after my nicknames, but now it’s just me front and center for the entire world to see, which is why I decided to go with a self-titled album.”

Jackiem has a great affinity for rhythm. “Ever since I was 12 in my mom’s house, I’ve been drumming on walls, tapping out rhythms with spoons and beating on anything that I can. I still have that habit today. I always hear beats in my head; it’s intriguing to see where they take me.” No wonder that The Reunion melts the style of smooth jazz with the beat of marching bands.

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Jackiem Joyner – Jackiem Joyner

Jackiem Joyner is ready for his Hollywood close-up. It’s already been a big year for the multidimensional sax player both professionally and personally. Dramatic events offstage have inspired his work in the spotlight while his passion for movies has influenced the songs, sounds and textures used in the creation of his third album, a self-titled disc that arrives as Joyner is poised to become a top-of-the-marquee smooth jazz star.

Like a silent film, Jackiem Joyner tells a story without words, with an instrumental voice that for the first time in the artist’s recording career includes a tenor sax in addition to his trademark alto and soprano horns. He also plays most of the other instruments on the album. As on his previous releases—Lil’ Man Soul and babysoul—Joyner wrote, produced, recorded and mixed the record aside from a few select cover tunes.

Sonically and compositionally, the collection reflects artistic progress and evolution while remaining true to Joyner’s core sound. Thematically, the moods and tones are varied, yet at their essence they are deeply rooted in the rich soil of soulful expression and raw emotion. Rhythmically, Joyner audaciously explores complex, astute and frenetic beats. Joyner explains, “Ever since I was 12 in my mom’s house, I’ve been drumming on walls, tapping out rhythms with spoons and beating on anything that I can. I still have that habit today. I always hear beats in my head; it’s intriguing to see where they take me.

“The whole record is about writing and making the type of record that I wanted to make. It’s me putting whatever I want on the album. I’m happy working with Mack Avenue because they gave me complete freedom to create. You can really hear me right upfront and my music. My first two albums were titled after my nicknames, but now it’s just me front and center for the entire world to see, which is why I decided to go with a self-titled album.”