Posts Tagged ‘ Freeze Frame ’

Freeze Frame – The Lost Book Of Moviescores

The musical career of keyboardist Ray Bach began in 1989 with the album The Book Of Movie Scores, released in 1991 on the label IC / Digit. Soon followed his second album The Crossover (1992). When Ray asked me to assemble the songs for the compilation Lincoln Park – The Best Of Freeze Frame and to write the liner notes, I insisted to include songs from the beginning of his period of creation.

My assumption Ray would pull copies of the early CDs, turned out to be wrong. Instead he studied the original Master tapes to eventually re-master these tapes. He went into his archive and found an astonishing amount of final mixes, demos, multi track tapes and discs with sequence data.

After carefully re-mastering the old tapes or new mixing the tracks, the result is The Lost Book Of Moviescores (2016). Instrumental, new age, film music, ambient music and no jazz at all. Enter The Wave has the freshness of his early years. Ray has developed his unique identity working out the special power of synthesizer.

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Freeze Frame – The Works

Since several decades the musician Ray Bach is associated with the project Freeze Frame, music timeless and in the border area of smooth jazz and new age. His new release The Works (2015) is greeted with a laughing and a crying eye. Sadness creeps in with the thought that it might be his last album.

Ray calls it his final album and a worthy ending. With as many as 16 songs he sweetens this termination. He is accompanied on individual pieces by Thomas Barquee, Liza, Konstanze Arens (vocals), Stephan Gade, Ricky Garcia, Jörn Becker (guitars), Georg Hahn (vocals, violin), Lars Slowak (vocals, bass), Nils Karstens (brass), Petra Rathmann (saxophon), and Benn Timms (trumpet).

The album starts with familiar sounds. A Perfect Day reminds of many of his earlier works from a creative period of 25 years. Carefree are swinging sounds by synthesizers and keyboard across the room. Ray is also ready to receive new impulses. The Skerries of Stockholm featuring singer Konstanze Arens is treading trendy ways.

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Freeze Frame – Experience

To fill a gap in education or to give a secret tip, from which side you approach the phenomenon Freeze Frame, it’s worth to discover. I am reporting for years now about Ray Bach‘s albums, but the novelty is consistent. His relative unfamiliarity for the American listeners is explained by the few far too few live performances.

This year, he delights us again with a new release. Experience is the costliest, which Ray has ever produced. The longest album, the most musicians, the largest production expenses. That makes curious! Ray comments꞉ “It’s all about experience, it’s all about influence and inspiration.”

As dazzling as his music, so different are his idols. He counts to his influences Solar Fire, Sakamoto and Yellow Jackets. Involved in the new project, in addition to arranger, songwriter, producer and keyboardist Ray Bach are Petra Rathmann (sax), Ricky Garcia (guitars), Lisa (vocals), Nils Karsten (trumpet), Lars Slowak (bass), Andrew McGuinness (drums), Georg Hahn (vocals, guitars, bass), and Dirk Bakker (drums).

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Freeze Frame – Best In Life

To find artists of German origin is not easy. Therefore it takes you back to those that are already known. Particularly gladly when they are characterized by special productivity. The keyboardist Ray Bach better known under his artist name Freeze Frame has already released the albums The Book of Movie Scores (1989), The Crossover (1992), Loving Life (1994), Feelin’ So Good (1996), A Balanced World (1999), Transition (2006), Colors Of Summer (2009), The Score Of Moviebooks (2012) and The Smooth Shore (2012).

This year he starts his activity with the EP Best In Life. Ray is joined by fellow-musicians Tom Farmer (sax), Petra Rathmann (sax), Lars Slowak (bass), Ricky Garcia (guitar), Tom Hapke (drums) and Stefan Gade (bass) on selected tracks. The Pulse Of ’13 introduces into the new project. With the familiar ease Ray leads us through his musical ideas.

Unlike on most other tracks is Ray accompanied on Return To Lincoln Park by most of the previous cited musicians. The tune has a certain New Age touch and exudes an epic romance. Based on a standard beat Ray offered with Day Of Sun ethereal sounds. On the Song With Greetings From Greece he processed his impressions of the trip, which he won in Greece. He does not sound like a typical Greek but remains attached to his own work. Petra Rathmann adds with the soprano sax her female note.

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Freeze Frame – The Smooth Shore

Freeze Frame is a project of German keyboardist and composer Ray Bach. Not related to the great German composer and organist of the Baroque Period he shared with him an amazing compositional talent. His creativity already meandered into the albums The Book of Movie Scores (1989), The Crossover (1992), Loving Life (1994), Feelin’ So Good (1996), A Balanced World (1999), Transition (2006), Colors Of Summer (2009) and The Score Of Moviebooks (2012).

Settled on the borderline between Smooth Jazz and New Age Ray creates a special German style of Smooth Jazz, which is similar to the music of Dancing Fantasy, Blue Knights, Colors In Motion, Interface and more.

In his comment of his previous album he wrote: “I was reminded of the creative process from 20 years ago and just wanted to go free and unencumbered to the approaching anniversary album, as I did on my debut. It was also a journey into the past. The process actually worked, the output was enormous, the material could have easily fit for a second album. Perhaps that will also be published.”

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Freeze Frame – The Smooth Shore

Ray Bach better known under his project-name Freeze Frame started his career with the legendary debut album The Book of Moviescores (1991), which was released on IC Digit the same year. He stayed connected with this label in the following years with The Crossover (1992), Loving Life (1994), Feelin’ So Good (1996), and A Balanced World (1999).

After a long hiatus he returned in 2006 with his album Transition followed by the album Colors Of Summer (2009) and The Score Of Moviebooks (2012). Ray Bach’s style belongs to the fields of smooth jazz, new electronic and Pop. He is a representative of the European smooth jazz with a slight but significant difference to the American Urban influenced approach.

The Smooth Shore (2012)  is the coolest and most relaxed Freeze Frame release ever. While the former release The Score Of Moviebooks took its listeners on a journey through time and space, with many different musical styles, the brand-new EP The Smooth Shore captures the mood spanning a sunny afternoon until the evening sunset on a Balearic island.

“It’s a declaration of love. I found this place a couple of years ago. The beautiful environment and the relaxed atmosphere give time to breathe and help recharge one’s batteries,” says Ray Bach about the new release.

The Smooth Shore will be available online through iTunes, Amazon and other platforms from June 18th.

Freeze Frame – The Score Of Moviebooks

Older readers will remember the glorious time of the label IC/Digit (Independent Composers/ Innovative Communication), on which Mark Sakautzky and Michael Weisser released their German version of New Age and Smooth Jazz. Dancing Fantasy, Terry Marshall, George Bishop, Blue Knights, Teekay, Freeze Frame were among the presented artists.

The story of Freeze Frame began with the album The Book of Movie Scores (1989), followed by The Crossover (1992), Loving Life (1994), Feelin’ So Good (1996), and A Balanced World (1999). On the label Laterne Tonträger Ray Bach, mastermind of Freeze Frame, released the albums Transition (2006) and Colors Of Summer (2009).

On his latest album The Score Of Moviebooks (2012) Ray is supported by Georg Hahn (vocals), Lars Slowak (bass), and Ricky Garcia (guitar). Ray comments his new album: “Behind the conceptual idea was that I was repeatedly asked about my debut album The Book Of Movie Scores. An album which I had created in just 3 to 4 weeks. I felt ecstatic! The content was no consideration of contemporary music, what was almost a little naive at that time.

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