Posts Tagged ‘ Brian Bromberg ’

Brian Bromberg – Compared To That

Brian Bromberg is one of the top five bassists worldwide. The GRAMMY nominated bass player grew up in a world of jazz. He already performed in early years with area jazz bands and symphonies. Although some of his twenty solo albums are settled in the smooth jazz realm, his musical love was always devoted to straight ahead jazz. “I still love playing with straight-ahead jazz artists and I want to do more acoustic, mainstream jazz albums myself.”

Brian’s new album Compared To That is such a mainstream jazz album, which also respects the desire for smooth jazz elements. The album was recorded live in between two days. Recording artists were beside Brian Alex Acuna, Gannin Arnold, Charlie Bisharat, Randy Brecker, Vinnie Colaiuta, George Duke, Bela Fleck, Mitch Forman, Larry Goldings, Jeff Lorber, Gary Meek and Tom Zink.

Fast paced, horn driven, bass loaded, that is the introducing Compared To That. Bromberg excels on Upright bass with impressive dexterity. Jeff Lorber brings with his signature piano virtuosity the piece to breathtaking highs.

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Brian Bromberg – Compared To That

Grammy nominated bass maestro Brian Bromberg continues to blaze his own audacious path through the jazz kingdom on Compared To That, which will be released June 5th by Artistry Music/Mack Avenue Records.  For his 20th solo collection of kinetic and combustible jazz of various forms, Bromberg produced, composed eight new songs, and herded a ten-piece horn section, a full orchestra string section and a prodigious collective of prominent musicians.  The first track to go to radio is his swinging take on the snappy Chicago hit, “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?”

It’s been a while since Bromberg recorded an album that swings so he primarily maintains a fast cadence on “Compared To That.”  Although the record leans towards straight ahead acoustic jazz, Bromberg refuses to color between the lines.  His visionary, multihued jazz palette swirls hard-charging swing, contemporary sheen, deep-fried funk, and touchingly beautiful balladry.  Throughout the album, Bromberg’s basswork is like a master’s class with the astute musician playing acoustic, electric and piccolo (both acoustic and steel string) basses.  With his piccolo basses tuned to sound like guitar, all of the lead melodies and solos throughout the collection that sound like guitar are actually piccolo bass.

An accomplished cadre lent their talents to the two days of live tracking including Alex Acuna, Gannin Arnold, Charlie Bisharat, Randy Brecker, Vinnie Colaiuta, George Duke, Bela Fleck, Mitch Forman, Larry Goldings, Jeff Lorber, Gary Meek and Tom Zink.  Bromberg’s tongue-in-cheek humor was deftly deployed when it came to titling his original compositions – “Rory Lowery, Private Eye,” “If Ray Brown Was A Cowboy?,” “A Little New Old School” and “I’m Just Sayin’” are a few examples – and his flair for choosing unexpected songs to cover shines brightly on an imaginative, toe-tapping rendition of the Rick James signature hit “Give It To Me Baby.”

“One thing I feel that makes Compared To That a unique project is that it is a live jazz recording that also has a ten-piece horn section on many tracks, a full orchestra string section on two cuts, and the production of a much bigger project.  Essentially, it really was a two-day live jazz recording session along with 3-1/2 months of the kind of production used on big pop records.  I truly blended the best of both worlds: live acoustic jazz with the audiophile of a major production,” explained Bromberg, who previewed the album at a Sunday brunch performance at the Berks Jazz Fest in Reading, Pennsylvania this past weekend (March 25).  “I went more to my jazz roots on this CD with a lot of swing and walking bass.  All in all, I think it is a fun listen for a true jazz CD and I am very proud of it.” Continue reading

Various Artists – Jazz Responds: An All-Star Compilation To Benefit Victims Of Human Trafficking

It is estimated that there are 27 million slaves in the world today, which is more than at any other time in history. This shocking statistic is even more compelling when you consider that approximately 1 million of these slaves are children. Many of these children, some as young as five years old, are forced to work as prostitutes in brothels to fuel the Global Sex Trade. Shockingly, this is not an issue relegated to Third World countries – it happens on nearly every continent, including right here in the United States.

So, what can we do about it?

The solution is complex because laws in every country need to be considered, the safety and anonymity of the victims must be considered, and the fact that human trafficking is a multi-billion dollar industry means there are enemies to those who would try and stop it.

However, there are solutions and you can take part in them. For example, making sure the products you buy are “Slave-Free” helps to curb the demand for slave labor. Being vigilant and knowing what signs to look for when you see young children or foreign workers in seemingly unfamiliar situations is important. Helping to fund groups that are working to rescue and restore victims and punish the perpetrators is crucial to eradicating the issue.

At FACT Alliance, our primary mission is the building of aftercare homes for both international and domestic victims. Studies have shown that, without proper aftercare, rescued victims often end up back in their slave life. There are known victims who could be rescued at this very moment, but they aren’t because there are not enough aftercare facilities to house and care for them. It is our hope to help raise money and partner with other existing organizations to fulfill this great need. By building new homes and supporting existing ones, we can begin to see more victims rescued and restored.

To learn more about the issue and how you can get involved (or to donate more!), please visit us at www.letsrespond.com.

All profits will go towards the rescue and restoration of victims of human trafficking and the child sex trade.
1. RICHARD SMITH – “D’BLUZE”
2. DAN SIEGEL – “SOMETIME TOMORROW”
3. MINDI ABAIR – “GIRLS NIGHT OUT”
4. BRIAN BROMBERG – “ISN’T IT BEAUTIFUL”
5. TONY GUERRERO – “GABRIELLA”
6. GRANT GEISSMAN – “SAY THAT!” (FACT Version)
7. GREG ADAMS – “FIVE TO ELEVEN”
8. PETER WHITE – “BOULEVARD”
9. BILL CANTOS – “LOVE WINS”
10. BLAKE AARON – “BUMPIN’ ON THE WEST SIDE”
11. GREG VAIL – “GOT IT GOIN’”
12. DAVID PACK– “UNTIL THE TIME” (Exclusive Track)

Support this mission and buy the album at CDBaby.

I Happened To Hear 12/2009

At Bass Day 2009 in Manchester I met Polish guitar wizard Adam Palma. He has worked with many of the top pop and jazz artists in Poland and with international names including Chris de Burgh and the Average White Band’s Hamish Stuart.

This is a startling album of solo acoustic guitar played fingerstyle with no overdubs or studio tricks – I say startling because at times you would think there were two or even three guitars. Many of the songs are originals, such as the bluesy opener ‘Rocky Mountains’ which displays dexterity I’ve only heard on records by the world’s finest players. I also love the chord changes in his gorgeous ‘When Tommy meets Chet’ and here Palma’s sense of humour is in evidence.

That same sense of humour surfaces on his rendition of the ‘Inspector Gadget’ theme. And it’s impossible not to smile during his staccato version of ‘Love and Marriage’. I’d love to hear this as part of a movie soundtrack – it really does bring something new, warm and endearing to an old song.

Continue reading I Happened To Hear 12/2009

Brian Bromberg – It Is What It Is

When it comes to list the leading jazz bass players of the world one certainly has to mention Brian Bromberg. Brian is one of those musicians who prefer the bass as lead instrument. Depending on the situation, Brian plays a variety of acoustic, electric and electronic (MIDI) basses including fretted, fretless, piccolo, upright and synth.

He doesn’t let up in pointing out that there are no guitar melodies or solos on his recordings. All melodies and solos that sound like guitar are played by Brian on piccolo basses.

On his new album It Is What It Is Brian is joined by George Duke, Patrice Rushen, Jeff Lorber, Dave Weckl, Dan Siegel, Randy Brecker, Eric Marienthal, Richard Elliot, Gerald Albright, Rick Braun and more! Brian is one of those rare musicians who offer a combination of jazz and smooth jazz on the same album.

Brian admits: “I was very closed- minded with tunnel-vision. But I grew up and realized I didn’t have the right to judge anyone for the music they want to play. I came to understand that musical validity is totally subjective. That’s when I began to stretch my own music into contemporary jazz and began playing on movie soundtracks and with pop, rock and world music artists”.

Continue reading Brian Bromberg – It Is What It Is

Brian Bromberg – It Is What It Is

Following his Grammy nominated Downright Upright and backed by a killer horn section, Brian Bromberg gets loose and funky throughout the 13 tracks on It Is What It Is, including his unique spin on the B52’s dance classic Love Shack.

The album features George Duke, Patrice Rushen, Jeff Lorber, Dave Weckl, Dan Siegel, Randy Brecker, Eric Marienthal, Richard Elliot, Gerald Albright, Rick Braun and more! Brian Bromberg has garnered a hard-earned reputation as one of the most versatile and respected players in music, amassing an enviable catalog of straight ahead and contemporary jazz showcasing both upright and electric basses. Confounding the music industry with a string of innovative, eclectic releases since 1985, Bromberg has spent the last decade recording projects driven by very specific sounds and themes – from Wood (acoustic bass) and Metal (electric bass) to other diverse projects celebrating the artistry of fretless bass pioneer Jaco Pastorius (Jaco) and his Grammy®-nominated smooth grooves of Downright Upright.

On his fourth project for the Mack Avenue label imprint Artistry Music, It Is What It Is, Brian unleashes another wide palette of styles letting the chips fall where they may. It’s a decidedly funky 13-track set that features a killer horn section and includes not only evocative original compositions but also two cover songs that are sure to raise some eyebrows: The B-52s’ new wave dance classic “Love Shack” and Quincy Jones’ instantly recognizable TV-Land nugget “Sanford & Son (The Streetbeater)”.

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