Archive for October 23rd, 2010

Wayman Tisdale – The Fonk Record

After a stellar career that produced eight top-selling jazz CDs and one gospel project, prepare yourself for a different side of Wayman Tisdale—one that was 12 years in the making!

It’s The Fonk Record featuring 11 original songs, Tisdale’s own funky vocals and a crew of down-and-dirty musicians, The Fonk Record also boasts three guest stars with extensive funk résumés—George Clinton, George Duke and Ali Woodson.

To those who knew him best, it seemed only natural that Tisdale would craft a funk project. “He always wanted to make funk music,” says Derek (DOA) Allen, who produced The Fonk Record and was one of Tisdale’s closest friends. “People are going to see a whole ‘nother side of Wayman on this record—he was on a mission to play as hard and funky as he could.”

Tisdale confided in Allen that a funk project was something he always wanted to do. At first it was a playful joke with a few demos here and there. Inspired by great funk artists like Bootsy Collins and Robert Wilson of the Gap Band, Tisdale created his own funky moniker: Tiz and named his band The Fonkie Planetarians. His power source came from Stinky the Sock! Those who were lucky enough to catch Tisdale in concert got a glimpse of his alter ego when he’d perform 20 to 30-minute funk-filled interludes during his jazz shows. “If you saw it, you knew it was the most explosive part of his show,” Allen says. “That’s when the party got started!” Continue reading

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Marc Antoine – My Classical Way

It starts with toe tapping… By the second chart, your fingers will likely join your tapping toes. Marc Antoine‘s recent CD release, My Classical Way on Frazzy Frog Music, draws in the listener irresistibly. He quickly transports you to the warm sensual breezes of his smooth jazz renditions. These tracks are familiar melodies of classical heavy hitters like Bach, Debussy, Paganini and Vivaldi.

A whimsical and joyful, Paris born Antoine draws heavily on his traditional classical background at Conservatoire de Paris for a solid understanding and delivery of each composer’s intention and personality, deftly translated to the lilting language of 2010 smooth jazz.

The unmistakable, sonorous influence of classical guitarist and mentor, Andres Segovia, winds subtly in and out of the charts, particularly through his rendition of Paganini’s Caprice #24.

The call and response pattern using the initial phrase of Pachelbel’s Canon in a traditional sounding orchestration allows Antoine to use the “straight” version as a counterpoint for his interpretive creativity. Listen closely as it fades in and out of the background seamlessly and perfectly yet surprisingly timed.

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