Posts Tagged ‘ fo/mo/deep ’

fo/mo/deep – The Groovy Goodness

I set out my stall when I reviewed fo/mo/deep’s previous record A Beautiful Bang and I’m glad to have been able to keep up with the band between the release of that record and 2014’s deliciously titled The Groovy Goodness.

As I type this, summer seems like it’s upon us and the burst of energy that is ’1974′ just makes it feel all the more real. The passionate sax and electric piano solos reinforce what the rhythm section has told you from minute one – it’s on! I just went back and listened to this song after drafting this first paragraph – because I can’t get that sax hook out of my head, in fact this whole song has grabbed me and won’t let go. Funk lovers are in more familiar territory with ‘Block Party’, which is a sax-led head-nodding number. There is a lot of air in Ron Holmes’ fretless bass line and André Scott’s snare drum pattern – which I always love – this must be a great jam live.

Is it a Motown track, or a big band number creepin’ up on you? Neither – it’s ‘Groidology’. It has a real swagger, helped by the loping upright bass line. I loved this song the first time I heard it and it gets better all the time. The rhythmic figure on piano and *that* trombone solo bring it on home. Mighty, mighty. Blues? Is John Lee Hooker in the house? ‘Peach Cobbler’ has an old Crusaders sound – and I mean that this sounds like Wilton Felder and Joe Sample circa 1972. The break midway through has an almost carnival vibe – it sounds like someone is having a ball in the studio!

Read more …

fo/mo/deep – The Groovy Goodness

Music in our times is often described with a certain kind of label like Jazz, Rock, Fusion etc.. But the musical concept of fo/mo/deep is different from that. They don’t seem to care for labels; they put different styles together, just as they like it.

The result can -once again- be enjoyed on their new record The Groovy Goodness. The Groovy Goodness takes the listener on a journey into the groovy and funky sounds of the seventies and the eighties of the last century.

Musical eclecticism is often used as a negative term, just to describe music, which contains nothing unique. But The Groovy Goodness shows, that ‘eclecticism’ can also be understood as ‘music without boundaries’.

Read more …

Fo/Mo/Deep – A Beautiful Bang

You can find out about this 5-piece, Ohio-based ‘funky jazz collective’ on their website. I can tell you that ‘A Beautiful Bang’ is fo/mo/deep’s second album (after ‘Eclecticism’) and, well, let’s get right into it…

I’m a fan of funky jazz collectives, such as Incognito and Down to the Bone and I’m already placing FMD squarely in that bracket when I hear the bass-driven groove of the opener ‘Jawjacka’ (love that title). This instrumental focuses on the funk and has some nice key changes. Keith Newton’s tenor sax is well up in the mix and sounds really strong. The whole song reminds me of Paz at their best. That same sax tone pervades on the sexy ‘Martini Blues’, which slows the pace right down and allows you to enjoy the flavour of Kevin Jones’ old-school electric piano. I’m drawn in already.

FMD’s take on Bobby Hutcherson’s ‘Montara’ has that deeply urban jazzy vibe that I’ve loved for so long in Incognito’s music. From the first few bars, I know I’ll be playing this for years. Ron Holmes’ sinewy bassline teams perfectly with André Scott’s crisp snare and underpins this gorgeous mid-tempo instrumental all the way. Over headphones especially, Kevin Pouncey’s percussion really adds a layer of style to this song. Fatkat’s fretless bass solo sure does it for me! On ‘Mama Said, Mama Said’ the only word you need to remember is funk. Some nice rhythm guitar gets poured over the already tight rhythm section. The organ solo on here is straight out of the 1970’s – where I live that’s a great thing!

Read more … 

Fo/mo/deep – Eclecticism

When you live in Columbus, Ohio and regularly attend concerts in and around that city, you certainly have the opportunity for a close encounter of the third kind, a musical one. I speak about fo/mo/deep, what stands according of the band’s website for an eclectic groove oriented-funky jazz collective.

Fo/mo/deep are Ron “FatKat” Holmes. Jr (bass), Kenneth “Pounce” Pouncey (percussion), Keith Newton (sax, flute), N. Michael Goecke (trombone), Andre Scott (drums), and Kevin Jones (Keys). For those, who haven’t listen to their music yet, we have good news. The group has just released their debut album Eclecticism.

Now, what’s that? According to Wikipedia Eclecticism is a conceptual approach that does not hold rigidly to a single paradigm or set of assumptions, but instead draws upon multiple theories, styles, or ideas to gain complementary insights into a subject, or applies different theories in particular cases.

Now, are we wiser? No! Let’s ask the bandleader. Ron explains: “Eclecticism in music draws from a plethora of grooves/styles from around the world.” In short we can await a diversity of styles.

Read more …

fo/mo/deep – Eclecticism

RHMedia is proud to announce the release of Eclecticism by fo/mo/deep. Released in August 2010, Eclecticism explores the limitless boundaries of contemporary jazz that is blended with funk, world and afrobeat.

Best known for their sizzling live performances, the fo/mo/deep groove is rooted in the experimental school of the 70s a time when jazz, soul and funk were one and the same. Seeking to defy the ordinary, this diverse collective of seasoned pros keeps things stirred up with unpredictable energy that moves. With lyrics like “expand your mind and your heart will follow”, the music of Eclecticism harkens back to the days when super groups hypnotized the world with bass driven ensembles and a full-bodied sound that reigned supreme. Once you listen to “Eclecticism,” you will understand that fo/mo/deep plays music like it’s meant to be hot, incalculable and emotionally satisfying.

John Petric of The Other Paper (Columbus, Ohio) recently described his experience in sampling the group live as a ” very good soul-funk-jazz band that had the crowd in the palm of its collective hand”. Adding, “the group has managed to do something that’s actually quite difficult for local, national or international talent, and that’s to go into a studio and transfer its live charisma onto a disc: Eclecticism.”

Accomplishing the arduous task of harnessing the “live” sound in the studio can be impossible for many bands. However, it is the Eclecticism of the band itself that makes harnessing the fo/mo/deep groove possible. “You couldn’t have put together a more diverse group of cats. They all have something interesting to say and contribute to this music,” said bassist and band-leader, Ron Holmes Jr.

The collective fo/mo/deep:

Ron “FatKat” Holmes. Jr (Bass)

Kenneth “Pounce” Pouncey (Percussion)

N. Michael Goecke (Trombone)

Keith Newton (Sax, Flute)

Andre Scott (Drums)

Kevin Jones (Keys)

Available now on CDBaby.

Source: Cheryl Hughey Promotions

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,413 other followers