Archive for July 31st, 2009

Hiroshima – Legacy

Sometimes music is touching me so deep, that I must spread the word like a herald. Hiroshima‘s new album Legacy is motivating and pushing me into this direction. I use the old world herald in full conscience. It’s the melting of old traditional Japanese with modern jazz instruments which makes Hiroshima’s music somehow antique in the sense of an “old master”, a term for an European painter of skill who worked before about 1800, or a painting by such a painter. Equally their music is so modern and unique that one cannot compare their Asian-American jazz fusion with the music of any other group.

The new album is a collection of songs from Hiroshima’s first musical decade. The songs were not taken from the previous albums but re-recorded by the band’s current lineup, the founders Dan (sax) and June Kuramoto (koto), joined by taiko drummer/percussionist Shoji Kameda, drummer/percussionist Danny Yamamoto, keyboardist Kimo Cornwell and bassist Dean Cortez. Further guest musicians are Terry Steele, Jim Gilstrap and Yvette Nii (vocals), Richie Gajate Garcia (percussion) and the string arrangements of maestro George del Barrio.

“When you start looking back at fifteen records over thirty years, that’s a lot of material to choose from, ” comments Dan Kuramato. “So we narrowed the scope to the first ten years, which includes five records – two of which were gold. We tracked everything live in my home studio for this new recording, with almost no overdubs. In many cases, the songs on this record are fairly similar to the originals. In some cases, they\’re very different.”

The album starts with the GRAMMY nominated Winds Of Change from Hiroshima’s album Odori (1980). The new recorded version is more orchestral and focused on the ancient Japanese instruments. Mighty taiko drums are underlining the modern drum beat. Dan’s fabulous sax is shimmering over the ancient sound.

Continue reading Hiroshima – Legacy

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